PICTURES OF SOME TOKENS

These pages are for those whose main interest is in researching their family history and have come across references to coins or tokens. For a brief account of the pre-decimal money system in Britain see my introduction. The introduction also has a couple of links to other sites for those who need to know than I can tell. The pictures here are of tokens. In some cases these would be used in place of coins; other tokens would be used for non-monetary purposes. The external links given below are to pages with much more information than I can provide.

TETBURY FARTHING
1669
The hole may mean this particular example was at one stage worn round the neck as a charm. Perhaps at a time when it was already old enough to be a curiosity. One side saysThis farthing is owned in Tetbury 1669 and the reverse says The arms of that burrough.

ROCHDALE TOKEN
1791
The images appear to be a fleece and a man on a hand loom. Presumably appropriate because of local industry at the time. The inscription just names the town on one side and the value (halfpenny) on the other.

FRED DUKE OF YORK
1795 halfpenny
The obverse says "Fred Duke of York" and "halfpenny 1795" and the reverse says "The wooden walls of old England" surrounding a sailing ship.

SPEYMOUTH CHURCH
COMMUNION TOKEN
This is from Moray in Scotland. Communion tokens seems to have had a long history. I am not sure exactly how they were used but I am told it was to make sure that those of ill-repute could not partake. One side just has the name of the church. The other has the inscription This do in remembrance of me. But let a man examine himself.

STOTT'S LANESIDE FOUNDRY
Haslingden
Not sure what this was for - reclaiming your coat after a shift? Staking a claim in the canteen queue? If anyone out there knows I would be pleased to hear from them. Apart from a circle the other side is blank.
Since writing that Joan Merrill has written to say that an uncle of hers (a member of the Chattwood family we are both researching) worked at the foundry. Her husband, Frank, has identified it as a "clocking-on" token which would be thrown in a pot on arrival at work and returned at the end of a shift. Now overtaken by card-swipe terminals but probably was more reliable.



BRITISH MONEY INTRODUCTION
PICTURES OF COINS

EXTERNAL LINKS

                    

                    

Last update 20/06/2001