Dean Evans Family History


Extracts from the Transcript of an Oral History recording made on 18 June 1980, by Mr Benjamin Rogers, 31 Little Dawley, Telford (Ironbridge Gorge Museum).
Burroughs Bank is between Lightmoor and Coalbrookdale. My earliest recollections of my grandparents was that they both kept animals, and I think that's what's given me my love of animals all my lifetime. Me granny and me grandad Rogers at the Dell Hole - they kept cows and pigs, and me grandfather Evans at Holywell Lane kept horses and did all his work in coal- merchant. .....
I can remember me grandad Evans very well. He had horses and was a local haulage man. He used to cart workmen's coal from the Meadow Pit and from Halesfield pit at Madeley Wood. He used to sell coal. He had a wagon there and he used to run drives around for people in the summertime. He was a nice old gentleman. I could tell you something about him, but I won't. I can remember one Sunday morning, sitting with me grandfather up in the gallery at Little Wenlock Chapel, and a man come to preach as who'd been accused of a charge of some description as was concerning the realm - I can tell you that much. Me grandad challenged him in the pulpit to say whether he was guilty of the charges brought against him. But I can't remember that much. He was one of the Evans's. There were two Evans's lived there then, when I was a kid. The one was Ben Evans, and the one next door was Robert Evans. And across in another house was Brian Evans. .... Number 22 was Robert Evans, brother to Benjamin as lived at number 25. Round the corner from Benjamin Evans's was John Powell's carpenters shop where he used to make coffins and do carpentry work. ......
The first thing we had to do when I was a kid, was to carry water, drinking water from Holywell Lane. And if dried up we used to go to the bath spout, across about 4 fields, over 3 stiles. .....
My first job on leaving school was at the Horsehay Company - as a rivet heating lad, the rivetters at Horsehay. I moved on from there to the drawing board with a well known template maker of the name Dick Smith from Horsehay as lived at Myford. And from there, from the drawing board, I went in to the yard as an assembler and as such like in the yard. I worked there until I was 20. And then during the First World War, I left and then I went to work at Coventry. ....( He returned from Coventry -) Mr Harry Evans was my Uncle. He was me mother's brother, and he got killed at Dawley with a runaway horse and cart - run over him and I was offered this small-holding then, and that I took on. .... The small-holding was at Holywell Lane. It had been run by my grandfather, and then passed on to me uncle Harry Evans, and then I took it on and kept it 14 years and then I was fed up with it and give it up. When I took this over, the coal business was run by me uncle of Holywell lane. We had a contract, taking off all the workmen's coal in this district, and they was allowed allowance of coal of one ton per month. ... We did local sales as well - house coal and all that - and really a good business it was. The stables was on the roadside as you go into Holywell Lane - where they kept the horses. The blacksmith shop was under the mount where me uncle Harry had did a bit of blacksmithing, general work for himself, but he didn't do any outside work that ever I knew. It was never a shoeing shop or anything like that for horses. I don't think he did his own horses.
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