Stage Shows and Scripts 

An American In Paris - A tribute to Cole Porter
(Premiered at The Little Theatre, Doncaster, July 1996)

"Around the year 1891, in New Orleans, Scott Joplin took a simple white European tune and fused it with black African syncopation…Ragtime was born, and with it the first uniquely American voice was heard on the world's musical stage…
Not by many…at least, not in the beginning.
But before too long this new musical synthesis was to become symbolic of emerging America…

In the same year, in Peru, Indiana, Cole Porter was also busy being born…"

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Rhythm Changes - The Story of George Gershwin
(Premiered at The Little Theatre, Doncaster, May, 1997)

"In 1985 the New York Metropolitan Opera staged its first full-length production of "Porgy and Bess" by George Gershwin.

It had taken 50 years for this masterpiece of American opera to achieve international status.

In 1935, the year of its creation, George Gershwin achieved what no other American had achieved before him - he took diverse elements from America's mélange of cultural origins and turned them into cohesive art-music…American art-music."

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Ars Celtica, Ars Romani - Celtic meets Gypsy...The Welsh connection.
(Premiered at Theatr Gwaun, October 2000)

"Iron was the seed from which sprang the great advance of the Celtic race.
Iron from the East, from the land of the Hittite.
Its black strength brought a new power, both as wealth and weapon.
Iron. The acorn from which sprang a great oak: the plundering spirit of  "man the warrior" -      a warrior invincible in his time. For Celtic domination was to last until the great spread of the Roman legions brought an end to tribal Europe."

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The Ellington Variations -  The story of Duke Ellington and his music.
(Premiered at Tenby Arts Festival, September, 1999)

"So who was the Duke of Ellington? Well, of course, there was no such person. As we all know, the Americans don't have an aristocratic hierarchy, although no doubt they would like to have. However, they do know style when they see it. And so did a pal of Edward Kennedy Ellington - Edgar McIntree - at their high school in Washington, who thought him to be "a pretty fancy guy", deserving a title. And so he was dubbed
Duke by his buddies, and it seems to have stuck.
Style? What is "style"? A tuxedo? Charisma? Being black?
These are no more than the trappings of style.
We are looking here at
musical  style par excellence."

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Journeys by GuitarA serialized history of Music and the Guitar.

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