Maltese Merchant Seamen

 

Often referred to as the ‘Fourth Service’ or sometimes ruefully as the ‘Forgotten Service’ the Merchant Navy has always played a key role in Maritime History. Maltese seamen have served on ships of many nations, and in times of conflict have lost their lives. In this file of Maltese seaman are included men who were born in Malta, but as their surnames suggest had British ancestors.

 

Memorial in St.Paul’s Anglican Cathedral, Valletta

 

During World War II just under 4,800 ships of the British, their Allies, and Neutrals were sunk, and the total number of men who died was around 32,000.

 

At Tower Hill in the City of London is a Memorial to Merchant Seaman which was unveiled on 5th November 1955 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. It takes the form of a crescent shaped sunken garden. Around the walls are bronze tablets recording the names of 23,765 men of the Merchant Navy who lost their lives. Their names and their ships are arranged alphabetically from A to Z around the half circle. The photographs of bronze tablets in this file were taken at the Tower Hill Memorial.

 

 

Peter ABDILLA, Fireman, was on board s.s. Dromore and s.s. Eagle Point in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 11 Strada San Domenico, Zeitun

 

 D. ABELA, a Fireman on ths s.s. Westergate. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic on 21st April 1918. He died along with the Master and eighteen other members of the crew

 

Emmanuel ABELA, died 2nd October 1941. He was Chief Steward on the Empire Wave, a newly completed armed merchant ship, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic, about 500 miles south of Cape Farewell, Greenland, on 2nd October 1941. 29 men died including the Master of the ship. 31 men were rescued and taken to Iceland

 

Paul ABELA, died 12th April 1941. He was a Steward on the Cable & Wireless Cable Ship Retriever. They were sailing from Lemnos to Piraeus when his ship was bombed by German aircraft at midnight off the coast of Greece. The ship sank and eleven men of the fortysix crewmen lost their lives

 

 

Carmel AGIUS, died 29th February 1944. He was the Boatswain on the Ascot. During a voyage from Colombo, Ceylon, to the Naval base of Diego Suarez, Madagascar, his ship was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine. The crew took to lifeboats and liferafts. The submarine surfaced and shelled the still floating ship, but then turned towards the survivors. These were machine gunned then rammed by the submarine. The men jumped into the sea to avoid death. The captain of the submarine then shelled the Ascot again as it was still afloat, before returning to machine gun the survivors for a second time. Again men threw themselves into the sea. The submarine then submerged. Seven exhausted men managed to swim to a liferaft and haul themselves onto it. An eighth man was found alive in the bottom of a lifeboat. All eight were picked up the following day by a Dutch vessel which took them to Aden

 

J. AGIUS, died 3rd December 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Dowlais, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and 25 crewmen died

 

John AGIUS, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 18 years, he was the son of Eliza and John Agius of 44 Halsafline Street, Paola

 

M. AGIUS, died 29th April 1918. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Ella Sayer when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 15 miles from the Royal Sovereign Lightvessel

 

S.P.J. AGIUS, died 28th November 1942. He was an Able Seaman on the Nova Scotia. This was a passenger ship requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport, as a troop carrier. The voyage was from Egypt via Aden to Durban, South Africa. On the morning of 28th his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank off Lourenco Marques, Mozambique. There was a large loss of life, 858 died including the Master, 194 survived. Amongst the dead were 650 Italian internees

 

V. AGIUS, died 30th July 1917. He was a Steward on the s.s. Ganges when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 8 miles off Cape Spartel

 

V. AGIUS, died 5th May 1917. He was a Steward on the s.s. Harmattan when his ship was sunk by a mine off the Algerian coast. Thirty-six men including the Master lost their lives

 

G. ANDRE, died 29th April 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Daleby and whilst on a voyage from Halifax to London his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat north-west of Fastnet in the Atlantic. The Master and 24 members of the crew lost their lives

 

E. AQUILINA, died 28th May 1917. He was a Steward on the s.s. Antinoe, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 150 miles off Bishop Rock. The Master and twenty men died

 

Anthony ATTARD, Able Seaman, R.F.A. Petrella died 4th February 1941. The son of Maria Assunta and Emmanuel Attard and husband of Angela Attard of Floriana. Buried in Tobruk War Cemetery

 

Carmelo ATTARD, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Coronato ATTARD, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Francesco ATTARD, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 18 years, the son of Luigi Attard of 27 Strada Santa Domenica, Victoria, Gozo

 

Francis ATTARD, died 7th November 1942. He was a F & T on the Newcastle based merchant ship Glenlea when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat north of the Azores in the morning of the 7th November. Of the 49 men on board there were five survivors. The Master was taken capture by the U-boat as a Prisoner of War and landed in France. Four other men spent 21 days in a lifeboat before being rescued by a Norwegian merchant ship and taken to New York

 

Giuseppe ATTARD, died 7th December 1939, aged 53 years. He was the Boatswain on the Thomas Walton, an old merchant ship launched in 1917. Whilst on a voyage from Port Talbot to Narvik in Norway it was torpedoed in Norwegian territorial waters by a German U-boat in the afternoon of the 7th. The ship broke in two and sank, and 13 men died. Another 31 survived and were rescued by a German merchant ship which landed them in Norway

 

Giuseppe ATTARD, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons, it was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

John ATTARD, died 5th May 1943, aged 29 years. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Holmbury, which was launched in 1925, and was based in Liverpool. On the 5th May 1943 the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, about 150 miles east of Cape Palmas, Liberia, West Africa, whilst on a voyage from South America, via Freetown, to England. Two crewmen died, the Master was taken as a Prisoner of War and brought to France whilst the other 43 men on board were landed in Liberia

 

Joseph ATTARD, died 28th November 1942. He was an Able Seaman on the Nova Scotia. This was a passenger ship requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport, as a troop carrier. The voyage was from Egypt via Aden to Durban, South Africa. On the 28th his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank off Lourenco Marques, Mozambique. There was a large loss of life, 858 died including the Master, 194 survived. Amongst the dead were 650 Italian internees

 

 

M. ATTARD, died 18th August 1917. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat

 

Paul ATTARD, Fireman on the s.s.Molesey. On 26th November 1929 his ship was wrecked on the Pembrokeshire coast of Wales. He was trapped on board but when the storm abated jumped into the still rough sea and swam to a small island known as Midland Rock, from which he was rescued

 

Alfred AZZOPARDI, died 17th March 1943, aged 58 years. He was Boatswain on the Zouave, a merchant ship with London as its home port. They were part of Convoy SC.122 which left New York destined for England. The Convoy was composed of fifty merchant ships, one rescue ship and nine escorts. They were half way between Canada and England with a full cargo of 7,000 tons of iron ore when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. The ship sank quickly stern first and several men were trapped in the engine room, but the majority managed to get away in a lifeboat

 

Emmanuel AZZOPARDI, died 23rd December 1941. A Donkeyman on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Giorgio AZZOPARDI, Trimmer, died 12th September 1918. He was on the Fleet Messenger HMS Sarnia. His ship was torpedoed in the Mediterranean. The son of Francesco and Paolo Azzopardi

 

Gerald AZZOPARDI, died 19th June 1940. An Able Seaman on board the British Monarch. Whilst on a voyage from Morocco to Glasgow with a full cargo of iron ore his ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat about 200 miles north west of Corruna, Spain. The Master John Ferguson Scott and his 39 man crew all died

 

Giuseppe AZZOPARDI, Able Seaman, in World War I. His home address in 1924 was 34 Strada Giardina, Ghainsielem, Gozo

 

Joachim AZZOPARDI, Able Seaman, was on board s.s. Sebek in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk when they were in the Atlantic about 145 miles from Tory Island, Northern Ireland, 21st April 1917. In 1924 his home address was in Gozo

 

John AZZOPARDI, Cook, was on board s.s. Harmatris in World War I. On 8th March 1916 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about a quarter of a mile off Boulogne, English Channel, and sank. In 1924 his home address was 27 Strada Reale, Valletta

 

S. AZZOPARDI, died 18th August 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat

 

Salvatore AZZOPARDI, died 28th August 1942, aged 35 years. A Greaser on the oil tanker San Fabian. His ship was sailing from the Caribbean to England in convoy when a German U-boat fired four torpedoes at the convoy. The San Fabian was hit and sank, with the loss of 26 men. 33 men were rescued and taken to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

 

R. BALDACCHINO, died 18th August 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat

 

Carmelo BARBARA, Fireman, was on board s.s. Rapallo in World War I. On 13th January 1918 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about a mile and a half off the coast of Sicily and sank. His home address was Strada Fossa, Casal Paula in 1924

 

G. BARBARA, died 3rd December 1917. He was a Steward on the s.s. Dowlais, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and 25 crewmen died

 

Lorenzo BARBARA, died 4th February 1942, aged 21 years. A F & T on the Loch Ranza. His ship was carrying radio equipment and anti-aircraft guns for the defence of Palembang, Sumatra. On 3rd February they were attacked by Japanese bomber aircraft in the South China Sea, off Malaysia. The ship was beached close by on Abang Island but was considered a total loss

 

William BARTOLO, Cook and Steward. In World War I he was on the s.s. Incemoor. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about fifty miles off Pantelleria on 20th August 1917. In 1924 his home address was 116 Strada San Domenica, Zabbar

 

Carmelo BONAVIA, Fireman, on board the s.s. Politania in World War I. His ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat 10 miles off Cape Sigli, Algeria, on 18th August 1917. In 1924 his home address was 75 Strada Santa Maria, Cospicua

 

C. BONELLO, died 16th December 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Bristol City when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic

 

Annunziato BONNANO, died 31st January 1944. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Caleb Sprague. They were on a voyage from London to Newport, but in the English Channel off Beachy Head the ship was hit by a torpedo fired by a German Motor Torpedo Boat. Twenty-two of the twenty-seven man crew lost their lives

 

C. BONETT, a Fireman on ths s.s. Westergate. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic on 18th August 1917. He died along with the Master and eighteen other members of the crew

 

Gio Maria BONNICI, died 13th October 1942. A F & T on the merchant ship Ashworth, His ship had left Halifax, Canada, with a full cargo of 7,300 tons of bauxite destined for Belfast, Northern Ireland. When south of Greenland, North Atlantic, they were torpedoed in the early hours of the morning of the 13th by a German U-boat and sank. All 49 men on board died, there were no survivors

 

Paolo BONNICI, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 37 years, the son of Salvatore and Teresa Bonnici, and husband of Maria Bonnici, 55 Strada San Domenica, Zabbar

 

Cammillo BORG, 60G, Fireman, Royal Navy Reserve, died 15th October 1917, aged 34 years. He was on board M.F.A. Whitehead when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 40 miles off Suda Bay, Crete. The son of Salvatore Borg of Cospicua and husband of Giovanna Borg

 

Domenico BORG, aged 19,,died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Emanuel BORG, died 14th February 1940. He was a F & T on board the merchant ship Langleeford, which was on its way from Canada to England with a cargo of 6,800 tons of wheat. Early that morning his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank with the loss of four crew members. The spot was about 70 miles off Fastnet, and the Master with 29 crewmen were rescued and put ashore in Ireland

 

George BORG, died 7th May 1943. He was a Fireman, on the Greek registered merchant ship Laconikos. They were on a voyage from Freetown, West Africa, to Ardrossan, Scotland and in the morning of the 7th when the ship was in the Atlantic about 400 miles west of Vigo, it was torpedoed by a German U-boat. He was killed together with 22 other men on board. Eleven men survived

 

Joseph BORG, died 5th May 1943, aged 23 years. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Holmbury, which was launched in 1925, and was based in Liverpool. On the 5th May 1943 the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, about 150 miles east of Cape Palmas, Liberia, West Africa, whilst on a voyage from South America, via Freetown, to England. Two crewmen died, the Master was taken as a Prisoner of War and brought to France whilst the other 43 men on board were landed in Liberia

 

 

Liberato BORG, was on board s.s. Montebello in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat 21st June 1918 and sunk, about 320 miles from Ushant. The Master and forty men lost their lives. His home address was 11 Strada Prigione, Vittoriosa, in 1924

 

Michael BORG, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Nicholas BORG, died 2nd December 1940. A Steward on the Lady Glanely. His ship started this voyage in Vancouver and carried a cargo of wheat and timber, the destination was London. They passed through the Panama Canal, but whilst in the North Atlantic the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. All 32 men on board lost their lives

 

Paolo BORG, a Fireman, Merchant Navy, in World War I. He was taken as a Prisoner of War. In 1924 his home address was 12 Strada Ospedale, Micabiba

 

Paolo BORG, Seaman, in World War I he was on board the s.s. Glenbridge. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Mediterranean, and beached, 27th November 1917. In 1924 his home address was 24 Strada San Francesco, Floriana

 

S. BORG, died in WWI. He was a Steward on the s.s. Malaga

 

John BOWDEN, died 12th April 1942, aged 29 years. He was a Radio Officer on the Rio Blanco. On 1st April his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 60 miles off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. They were carrying a cargo of about 6,500 tons of iron ore from the U.S.A. to England. Nineteen men died, and twenty-one survivors were picked up by Royal Navy and Royal Canadian Navy

 

Giovanni Maria BRIFFA, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 41 years, the son of Felice and Anna Briffa, and husband of Maria Briffa, of Zabbar

 

Carmel BRINCAT, died 10th June 1941, aged 40 years. A Greaser on the merchant ship Ainderby, In February his ship was damaged by gunfire from the German Cruiser Admiral Hipper, and put into Funchal, Madeira. The repairs took three months, and after sailing from Funchal, during the morning of 10th June his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, and sank about 130 miles off the west coast of Ireland. The ship was carrying a cargo of 7,700 tons iron ore. Twelve men died that day and 29 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

John BRINCAT, died 24th February 1941. A F & T on the merchant ship Linaria,  carrying a cargo of coal. It was south of Iceland in the North Atlantic when in the darkness it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk. All 34 men on board the ship lost their lives

 

Joseph BRINCAT, Able Seaman. He was on board s.s. Glenbridge in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Mediterranean, and beached, 27th November 1917.In 1924 his home address was in Gozo

 

F. BUGEJA, died 17th May 1918. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Mavisbrook which was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Cabo de Gata, on the Spanish Mediterranean coast. The Master and seventeen crewmen lost their lives

 

Giuseppe BUGEJA, died 17th October 1944, aged 58 years. He was a Fireman on the Empire Collins

 

Romeo BUGEJA, died 18th February 1941. A Carpenter on the motor tanker Edwy R. Brown. His ship was loaded with petroleum products and on its way to Liverpool. When south east of Iceland it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. All the 50 men on board died, there were no survivors

 

C. BUHAGIAR, died 17th May 1918. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Mavisbrook which was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Cabo de Gata, on the Spanish Mediterranean coast. The Master and seventeen crewmen lost their lives

 

John BUHAGIAR, died 12th September 1940. He was a Donkeyman on the steamship Gothic. His ship had left Immingham for a short voyage up the east coast of England to Teeside. Off Spurn Point they struck a mine. Of the twenty-four man crew, twelve men lost their lives

 

 

Angelo BUSUTTIL, Fireman, was on board the s.s. Politania in World War I. His ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat 10 miles off Cape Sigli, Algeria, on 18th August 1917. In 1924 his home address was 77 Strada San Lazzaro, Cospicua

 

Angelo BUSUTTIL, Fireman, was on board the s.s. Politania in World War I. His ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat 10 miles off Cape Sigli, Algeria, on 18th August 1917. His home address was 87 Strada Santa Maria, Cospicua, in 1924

 

Nazareno BUSSUTIL, died 9th July 1943, aged 45 years. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Manchester Citizen, In the middle of the night whilst his ship was off Lagos, in the Gulf of Benin, West Africa, it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk. 28 men lost their lives, but 76 survived and were picked up by a French Corvette and taken to Lagos

 

Gerald BUTTIGIEG, died 29th July 1943. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Cornish City. His ship was in the Indian Ocean, south east of Madagascar, carrying a cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. 37 of the men on board died, but six were rescued by the Australian Navy HMAS Nizam and taken to Mauritius

 

Publio BUTTIGIEG, died 7th November 1942. He was an Able Seaman on the Newcastle based merchant ship Glenlea when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat north of the Azores in the morning of the 7th November. Of the 49 men on board there were five survivors. The Master was taken capture by the U-boat as a Prisoner of War and landed in France. Four other men spent 21 days in a lifeboat before being rescued by a Norwegian merchant ship and taken to New York

 

Giuseppe CACHIA, Fireman, was on board the s.s. Caledonia in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 125 miles from Malta. The ship sank, and the Master was taken as a prisoner. One crewman lost his life. In 1924 his home address was 45 Strada San Giorgio, Hamrun

 

Henri CAFFARI, died 23rd December 1941. A Pantryman on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Anthony CALIGARI, died 7th March 1943, aged 19 years. An Ordinary Seaman on the Motor Tanker Empire Light. Whist sailing from Manchester to New York his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat on the 7th and was abandoned badly damaged. Of the 50 men on board, 45 were killed and the five survivors taken by HMS Beverley to St.Johns. Newfoundland. On the 12th March the abandoned ship was sunk by a German U-boat

 

Louis CALLEJA, died 24th February 1942. A Carpenter on the merchant ship White Crest. Whilst in the North Atlantic about half way between Canada and England his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. Seven men died and seven men survived

 

Leonard CALLUS, died 3rd February 1942, aged 35 years. A F & T on the Loch Ranza. His ship was carrying radio equipment and anti-aircraft guns for the defence of Palembang, Sumatra. On 3rd February his ship was attacked by Japanese bomber aircraft in the South China Sea, off Malaysia. The ship was beached close by on Abang Island but was considered a total loss

 

V. CALLUS, died 22nd March 1917. He was a Fireman on the m.v. Stuart Prince when his ship was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland by a German U-boat. The Master and nineteen crewmen lost their lives

 

Antonio CAMENZULI, died 6th September 1941, aged 30 years, on board the Maine

 

Carmelo CAMILLERI, died 30th April 1843, aged 41 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Corabella. His ship was on a voyage from West Africa to England with a cargo of about 8,000 tons of manganese ore. When they were about 130 miles south west of Freetown the ship was struck by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat and sank. Nine of the men on board died, but there were 39 survivors who were picked up by HMS Birdlip and landed at Freetown the next day

 

 

Emmanuele CAMILLERI, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 26 years, born in Zeitun, the son of Ann and Alexander Camilleri

 

Giuseppe CAMILLERI, Carpenter, was on board s.s. Sebek in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk when they were in the Atlantic about 145 miles from Tory Island, Northern Ireland, 21st April 1917. In 1924 his home address was 12 Strada Magri, Hamrun

 

Joseph CAMILLERI, died 15th December 1941, aged 21 years. A member of the crew of the merchant ship Empire Barracuda, His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the early hours when it was 34 miles off Cape Trafalgar, Southern Spain. Thirteen men died and 39 were rescued by the Royal Navy and taken to Gibraltar 

 

Joseph CAMILLERI, died 13th October 1942. A F & T on the merchant ship Ashworth, His ship had left Halifax, Canada, with a full cargo of 7,300 tons of bauxite destined for Belfast, Northern Ireland. When south of Greenland, in the North Atlantic, it was torpedoed in the early hours of the morning of the 13th by a German U-boat and sank. All 49 men on board died, there were no survivors

 

Joseph CAMILLERI, died 7th November 1942. He was a F & T on the Newcastle based merchant ship Glenlea when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat north of the Azores in the morning of the 7th November. Of the 49 men on board there were five survivors. The Master was taken capture by the U-boat as a Prisoner of War and landed in France. Four other men spent 21 days in a lifeboat before being rescued by a Norwegian merchant ship and taken to New York

 

Laurence CAMILLERI, died 25th January 1917. He was a Fireman on the Laurentic. A passenger ship of the White Star Line, which became a troopship in 1914, then an auxilliary cruiser. His ship sailed from Liverpool bound for Halifax and apart from passengers was carrying a valuable cargo of around 3,200 gold bars, when they struck two mines off Malin Head, Co.Donegal, Ireland. Of the 475 men on board, 354 lost their lives, many from exposure in the freezing cold sea. After the war the bullion was salvaged

 

M. CAMILLERI, died 22nd March 1917. He was a Fireman on the m.v. Stuart Prince when his ship was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland by a German U-boat. The Master and nineteen crewmen lost their lives

 

William CAMILLERI, died 2nd April 1943. He was an Assistant Steward on the merchant ship Melbourne Star. It was carrying a mixed cargo, but included ammunition and torpedoes. Early in the morning when his ship was about 500 miles from Bermuda it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and exploded. 125 men died. Four crewmen survived and drifted for 39 days in a lifeboat until spotted by an American Navy flyingboat which rescued them. They were taken to Bermuda. Each of the men was later awarded the British Empire Medal

 

Francesco CARABOTT, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. The son of Catarina and Lorenzo Carabott, and husband of Esther Carabott, Strada Giardino Botanico, Zeitun

 

Gaetano CARABOTT, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 36 years, the son of Catarina and Lorenzo Carabott, and husband of Consiglia Carabott of Zeitun

 

Michele CARABOTT, died 10th January 1943, aged 44 years. A Greaser on the tanker British Dominion. A Convoy of nine tankers sailed from Trinidad on 28th December 1942 for Gibraltar, but seven including the British Dominion were attacked and sunk by German U-boats in the Atlantic. His ship was carrying about 9,000 tons of aviation spirit when it was hit by three torpedoes and abandoned north west of the Canary Islands. 37 men on board were killed and the 16 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy and taken to Gibraltar

 

Amadeo CARUANA, died 2nd December 1940. A Cook on the Lady Glanely. His ship started this voyage in Vancouver and carried a cargo of wheat and timber, the destination was London. They passed through the Panama Canal, but whilst in the North Atlantic the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. All 32 men on board lost their lives

 

Antonio CARUANA, was on the s.s. Romford in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about three miles off Cape Carthage, 10th February 1918. The Master and twenty-seven men lost their lives. In 1924 his home address was 69 Strada Santa Maria, Cospicua

 

Antonio CARUANA , Fireman, was on the s.s. Antinoe in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 150 miles off Bishop Rock, Scilly Isles, south west of England. The Master and twenty men died, 28th May 1917. In 1924 his home address was 15 Strada Reale, Hamrun

 

Carmelo CARUANA, Fireman, was on the s.s. Politania and s.s. Hathor in World War I. His home address was 30 Strada Azzoppardi, Hamrun, in 1924

 

Felix CARUANA, died 4th August 1940. A member of the crew of the merchant ship Gogovale. His ship was on a voyage from Montreal to London with a cargo of about 6,400 tons of flour. In the middle of the night they were south of Iceland when a torpedo fired by a German U-boat struck. The ship was sunk. Three men died, and 36 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

G. CARUANA, died in WWI. He was a Cook on the Italian ship s.s. Lillah

 

Giovanni CARUANA, died 2nd December 1940. A Donkeyman on the Lady Glanely. His ship started this voyage in Vancouver and carried a cargo of wheat and timber, the destination was London. They passed through the Panama Canal, but whilst in the North Atlantic the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. All 32 men on board lost their lives

 

 

J. CARUANA, died 10th February 1918. He was a Donkeyman on the s.s. Romford  when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about three miles off Cape Carthage. The Master and twenty-seven men lost their lives

 

Joseph CARUANA, was on board s.s. Zillah in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 25 miles off Murmansk, North coast of Russia. In 1924 his home address was 17 Strada Birbixchilla, Casal Paula

 

Paul CARUANA, aged 22 years, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

S. CARUANA, died in WWI. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Halifax

 

Carmel CASSAR, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Giuseppe CASSAR, 16G, Fireman, Royal Navy Reserve, died 15th October 1917, aged 39 years. He was on board M.F.A. Whitehead when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 40 miles off Suda Bay, Crete. The son of Vittoria and Francisco Cassar and husband of Margherita Cassar, of Hamrun

 

M. CASSAR, died 18th August 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat

 

V. CASSAR, died 13th March 1917. He was Fireman on the s.s. Brika which was torpedoed by a German U-boat

 

S. CASSAR DESAIN, died in WWI. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Halifax

 

Carlo CAUCI, died 8th January 1945. He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Coronato CAUCI, died 26th February 1941. A Sailor on the 5,000 ton Llanwern. Bombed and sunk by German aircraft whilst in convoy about 300 miles off Blacksod Bay, Co. Mayo, Ireland. Twenty-seven of those on board lost their lives

 

Francesco CHIRCOP, Fireman, in World War I he was on board the s.s. Caledonia. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 125 miles from Malta. The ship sank, and the Master was taken as a prisoner. One crewman lost his life. In 1924 his home address was 9 Strada Annunziata Nuova, Hamrun

 

Giovanni CIANTAR, Able Seaman, during World War I was on board the s.s. California. In 1924 his home address was 20 Strada Manderaggio, Valletta

 

E. CIAPARRA, died 28th March 1917. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Wychwood when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland. Thirty-seven men lost their lives

 

Antonio CILIA, Fireman, on board the s.s. Imperial Transport in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk, about 140 miles from Alexandria, 11th April 1917. The Master was taken as a prisoner. In 1924 his home address was 52 Strada San Gaetano, Hamrun

 

Carmelo CILIA, Steward, was on board s.s. Paros in World War I. When his ship was about 30 miles from Bardsey Island it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. In 1924 his home address was 11 Strada San Andrea, Valletta

 

Antonio CINI, died 27th March 1941. A crewman on the merchant ship Koranton. His ship left Halifax on the 10th with a cargo of pig iron destined for Hull. They were about halfway between Canada and England, just south of Iceland, when during the morning of the 27th the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank immediately. All the 34 men on board died

 

Carmelo CINI, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea

 

John COSTA, died 12th October 1941, aged 56 years. He was a Fireman on the cargo ship Glynn. Whilst on a voyage from London up the east coast of England to the Tyne his ship was attacked by German bomber aircraft, off Lowestoft. It was badly damaged and had to be sunk by the Royal Navy

 

A. CUTAJAR, died 5th February 1918. He was a Seaman on the Anchor Line ship s.s. Tuscania, which sailed from Hoboken, New Jersey on 23rd January carrying 2,397 American soldiers and were in a Convoy bound for England. Off the coast of Ireland the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. From the American soldiers 2,187 were rescued as were a number of the ship’s crew by other ships in the Convoy

 

Alfonso CUTAJAR, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 48 years, the son of Andrea and Giovanna Cutajar, of Cospicua, and husband of Caterina Tabone Cutajar, 106 Strada Sammat, Paola

 

Anthony CUTAJAR, died 8th November 1941, aged 36 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Hazelside, which was on a voyage from Cardiff to Egypt via South Africa. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 600 miles south east of the island of St.Helena, in the South Atlantic. Two men died and forty-four other men on board were rescued and taken to Capetown, South Africa

 

Benjamin CUTAJAR, died 14th April 1942. He was a Donkeyman on the tanker Empire Amethyst. His ship was carrying about 12,000 tons of motor spirit when in the early hours of the 14th it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 40 miles south of the island of Haiti in the Caribbean Sea. The Master, Geoffrey Durbridge Potter, and the entire crew of forty-six men died

 

C. CUTAJAR, died 15th April 1917. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Arcadian which was torpedoed by a German U-boat, and thirty-five men lost their lives

 

Carmel CUTAJAR, died 18th October 1940. A Sailor on the merchant ship Fiscus. His ship was in Convoy SC7 which consisted of around thirty ships, and left Nova Scotia on 5th October. They were carrying a cargo of steel and crated aircraft on deck. In the evening of the 18th east of Rockall five German U-boats attacked the convoy and caused havoc. The Fiscus was hit by a torpedo and exploded then sank. There were no survivors. From this Convoy twenty-one ships were sunk by German U-boats

 

Francis CUTAJAR, Able Seaman, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 30 years, he was the son of Giuseppe and Teresa Cutajar, and husband of Maria Cutajar, 66 Strada San Lorenzo, Vittoriosa

 

John CUTAJAR, died 5th August 1941. A Greaser on the merchant ship Swiftpool. His ship was loaded with a cargo of 8,000 tons iron ore bound for Middlesbrough. In the middle of the night they were in the Atlantic west of Ireland when they torpedoed by a German U-boat with the loss of 42 lives. Two men survived and were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Paolo CUTAJAR, Fireman, was on board s.s. Madura in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk, 18th October 1917, about 23 miles from Bishop Rock, Scilly Isles, south west of England. Three crewmen lost their lives. His home address was 100 Vicolo Sneidek, Cospicua, in 1924

 

Salvatore CUTAJAR, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Giuseppe DARMANIN, Fireman, was on board s.s. Imperial Transport, s.s.Politania and s.s. Hathor, in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 52 Strada San Pietro Paolo, Senglea

 

John DEBATTISTA, died 23rd December 1941. A Fireman on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

A. DEBONO, died in WWI. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Gladpuin

 

C. DEBONO, died in WWI. He was Fireman on the s.s. Yola

 

Carmelo DEBONO, died 11th April 1943. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Lancastrian Prince. His ship was in a convoy sailing in ballast from England to North America when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic close to Newfoundland. All the 45 men on board lost their lives

 

 

Joseph DEBONO, died 11th September 1941. A F & T on the merchant ship Stonepool. His ship was carrying a cargo of grain and was bound for Avonmouth, when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat in the middle of the night. They were south of Cape Farewell, Greenland, North Atlantic. 42 men died and there were seven survivors

 

Orlando DEBONO, Ordinary Seaman was on board the s.s. Baynesk in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk about 130 miles from Alexandria. Seven men lost their lives. In 1924 his home address was 21 Strada Fra Diego, Hamrun

 

Giuseppe DEGIORGIO, Fireman, was on board s.s. Politania in World War I. His ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat 10 miles off Cape Sigli, Algeria, on 18th August 1917. In 1924 his home address was 25 Strada Santa Teresa, Cospicua

 

Giuseppe DEGIORGIO, died 23rd February 1941. He was a Greaser on the merchant ship Anglo Peruvian. They had a full cargo of around 3,000 tons of coal when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat south of Iceland. 29 men died and 17 survivors were picked up and landed in Halifax

 

Carmel DEGUARA, died 10th June 1941, aged 36 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Ainderby, In February his ship was damaged by gunfire from the German Cruiser Admiral Hipper, and put into Funchal, Madeira. The repairs took three months, and after sailing from Funchal, during the morning of 10th June his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, and sank about 130 miles off the west coast of Ireland. The ship was carrying a cargo of 7,700 tons iron ore. Twelve men died that day and 29 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

M. DEMANUELE, died 18th August 1917. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat

 

Emmanuele DePARES, aged 23 years, of Strada San Ursola, Valetta, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

George DUCA, died 6th June 1940, aged 43 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Frances Massey. His ship was on a voyage from Newfoundland to Glasgow with a cargo of 7,500 tons of iron ore. They were torpedoed by a German U-boat in the middle of the night when they were off the west coast of Northern Ireland and the ship sank immediately. Only the Master survived, the other 34 men on board all died

 

Giuseppe EDWARDS, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 24 years, the son of Giovanna and Joseph Edwards, of Paola

 

Angelo ELLUL, Able Seaman, was on board s.s. Milly in World War I. His ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat 6th September 1918, about two miles off Tintagel Head, Cornwall. His home address was in Nadur, Gozo, in 1924

 

Vincent ELLUL, died 17th October 1941. A Fireman on the tanker Pass of Balmaha, on a voyage from Alexandria, Egypt, to Tobruk loaded with petrol. Torpedoed by a German u-boat about fifty miles west ofAlexandria. Due to the cargo the ship was engulfed in flames and there were no survivors amongst the 18 men on board

 

James EVANS, died 13th October 1942. A Donkeyman on the merchant ship Ashworth, His ship had left Halifax, Canada, with a full cargo of 7,300 tons of bauxite destined for Belfast, Northern Ireland. When south of Greenland, in the North Atlantic, it was torpedoed in the early hours of the morning of the 13th by a German u-boat and sank. All 49 men on board died, there were no survivors

 

C. FALZON, died October 1918. He was a Greaser on the s.s. Otranto which sank after a collision with the s.s. Kashmir in the Irish Sea

 

C. FALZON, died October 1918. He was a Greaser on the s.s. Otranto which sank after a collision with the s.s. Kashmir in the Irish Sea

 

Carmelo FALZON,died 6th June 1940, aged 39 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Frances Massey. His ship was on a voyage from Newfoundland to Glasgow with a cargo of 7,500 tons of iron ore. They were torpedoed by a German U-boat in the middle of the night when they were off the west coast of Northern Ireland and the ship sank immediately. Only the Master survived, the other 34 men on board all died

 

Charles FALZON, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Francesco FALZON, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 21 years, the son of Maria and Michele Falzon, of Gozo

 

Giuseppe FALZON, died 2nd February 1941. He was a Carpenter on the merchant ship Empire Engineer. His ship became a straggler from a convoy to England. It was carrying a cargo of steel ingots when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic off Cape Farewell, Greenland. All the 39 men on board lost their lives

 

G.B. FALZON, died in WWI. He was a Cook on the s.s. Halifax

 

J. FALZON, died in WWI. He was Chief Steward on the s.s. Halifax

 

Joseph FALZON, died 30th August 1940. A crewman on the merchant ship Chelsea. His ship was in a convoy from Canada and carried 7,600 tons of maize. They were 58 miles off Cape Wrath when in the very early hours of the morning a German U-boat fired torpedoes at the convoy. Three merchant ships were hit. The Chelsea initially stayed afloat but later foundered. 24 men died, and 11 were rescued by the Royal Navy 

 

Michael FALZON, died 30th August 1940. A crewman on the merchant ship Chelsea. His ship was in a convoy from Canada and carried 7,600 tons of maize. They were 58 miles off Cape Wrath when in the very early hours of the morning a German U-boat fired torpedoes at the convoy. Three merchant ships were hit. The Chelsea initially stayed afloat but later foundered. 24 men died, and 11 were rescued by the Royal Navy

 

Salvatore FALZON, died 30th August 1940. A crewman on the merchant ship Chelsea. His ship was in a convoy from Canada and carried 7,600 tons of maize. They were 58 miles off Cape Wrath when in the very early hours of the morning a German U-boat fired torpedoes at the convoy. Three merchant ships were hit. The Chelsea initially stayed afloat but later foundered. 24 men died, and 11 were rescued by the Royal Navy

 

 

Salvatore FALZON, died 3rd April 1941. He was an Able Seaman on the tanker British Viscount, which was carrying 9,500 tons of fuel oil for the Admiralty, and destined for Scapa Flow. In the early morning of the 3rd they were torpedoed by a German U-boat south of Iceland. The Master and 27 men died, whilst 20 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy and put ashore at Liverpool

 

V. FARRINGTON, died in WWI. He was a Steward on the s.s. Halifax

 

A. FARRUGIA, died in WWI. He was a Trimmer on the s.s. Halifax

 

Coronato FARRUGIA, died 27th July 1941, aged 24 years. A Sailor on the merchant ship Hawkinge. His ship was carrying a cargo of coal from Glasgow to Lisbon. In the middle of the night they were torpedoed by a German U-boat about 500 miles north west of Corunna, Northern Spain. Fifteen men on board lost their lives, whilst sixteen survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Gaetano FARRUGIA, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 23 years, the son of Barbara and Spiridione Farrugia, of 81 Strada San Trofimo, Sliema

 

George FARRUGIA, died 15th December 1940. He was a Mess Room Boy, on the N.C. Monberg, an ex-Danish cargo ship now loaded with a full cargo of coal and sailing from the Tyne down the east coast of England to London. When his ship was off Smith’s Knoll light vessel, opposite Aldeburgh, it was torpedoed by a German Motor Torpedo Boat 

 

Joseph FARRUGIA, died 24th June 1944. A F & T on the collier Empire Lough. On this occasion his ship was carrying supplies across the English Channel to the Normandy beachhead eighteen days after the Allies invasion on D-Day. Attacked by the Germans, the ship was beached near Folkestone, but was a total loss

 

Nicholas FARRUGIA, died 5th August 1941. A F & T on the merchant ship Swiftpool. His ship was loaded with a cargo of 8,000 tons iron ore destined for Middlesbrough. In the middle of the night they were in the Atlantic west of Ireland when they torpedoed by a German U-boat with the loss of 42 lives. Two men survived and were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Paolo FARRUGIA, aged 18 years, of Strada San Giuseppe, Valletta, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Salvatore FARRUGIA, died 6th June 1940, aged 22 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Harcalo. They had loaded a cargo of ore at a North African port and joined a convoy at Gibraltar for the voyage to England. They were heading for Middlesbrough, and were passing through the Straits of Dover when they struck a mine off Ramsgate

 

Salvo FARRUGIA, died 6th September 1941, aged 41 years, on board the Maine

 

Vincent FARRUGIA, died 26th November 1942. A Fireman on the brand new merchant ship Ocean Crusader, built at Portland, Maine. Loaded with a mixed cargo they left New York on the maiden voyage on 19th November bound for Avonmouth. On the 26th in the middle of the day they were torpedoed by a German U-boat and all 45 men on board died

 

Carmelo FAVA, died 27th July 1940. He was a Fireman on the sand dredger Durdham, which sank after striking a mine

 

Antonio FENECH, (served as A. SMITH), died on 9th October 1917, aged 53 years. He was a Donkeyman on the s.s. Poldown when his ship sunk after striking a mine, about two miles off Trevose Head. The Master and seventeen crewmen lost their lives. The son of Luigi and Vincenza Fenech

 

Carmelo FENECH, Assistant Canteen Manager, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling  on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 34 years, the son of Michelina and Carmelo Fenech, and husband of Marianna Fenech of 5 Strada Dietro la Chiesa, Sliema

 

Carmelo FENECH, died 24th January 1942, aged 50 years. He was a Greaser on the merchant ship Empire Wildebeeste, In the early morning of the 24th his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic east of New York. Nine men died in the attack and 29 were saved, and taken by the U.S. Navy to Bermuda

 

Edward FENECH, died 13th January 1945. He was a Fireman & Trimmer on board the Inventor

 

Emmanuele FENECH, died 18th August 1917, aged 30 years, on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat. The son of Antonia and Francesco Fenech, and husband of Mrs. Carmela Fenech, nee Meylack, of Valletta

 

 

G.M. FENECH, died 12th August 1915. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

James FENECH, died 27th May 1940. He was a Boy on the merchant ship Sheaf Mead. His ship was sailing from Swansea to Philadelphia in ballast when it was struck by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat. They were about 180 miles off Cape Finistere, on the west coast of Spain. Thirty-two men lost their lives. Five were rescued and landed in Ireland

 

 

Vincenzo FENECH, died 31st December 1939. He was a Fireman on the merchant ship Box Hill. His ship struck a mine off the Humber Lightship in the North Sea, and sank with the loss of 22 lives

 

Manuel FERNANDEZ, died 2nd January 1942. He was a Fireman on the merchant ship Waziristan, part of convoy PQ-7a to Russia. His ship left Iceland on 26th December but became separated from its escort by bad weather, and was stranded on the edge of the Polar ice cap. Attacked by German aircraft in the Barents Sea off the north coast of Norway, then sunk by a German U-boat

 

Angelo FORMOSA, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 31 years, the son of John and Carmela Formosa of 62 Strada Lampuka, Paola

 

Charles FORMOSA, died 10th February 1941. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Courland. His ship was carrying a general cargo from Lisbon to London when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 160 miles off the Portuguese coast. 26 men died and four survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Giuseppe FORMOSA, died 19th April 1942. He was a Greaser on the merchant ship Harpagon. His ship left New York on the 17th bound for Bombay via Capetown and was carrying about 8,000 tons of cargo including military equipment. They were in the Atlantic about level with the State of Carolina when hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat. 41 men on board were killed and eight survivors were picked up by an Argentinian merchant ship and put ashore in Buenos Aires

 

Michael FORMOSA, died 7th January 1941. He was a Fireman on the merchant ship Kingston Hill. His ship was carrying about 8,300 tons of coal and had left Cardiff bound for Egypt via Capetown. In the middle of the night they were torpedoed by a German U-boat when they were in the Central Atlantic about 450 miles south west of the Cape Verde islands. 14 men died, but 48 survived and were picked up the Royal Navy and an American tanker

 

Joseph FORTI, died 14th January 1942. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Empire Surf. His ship had left Florida and was in a convoy to England when just after midnight they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. At the time they were south of Iceland in the North Atlantic. Forty-seven men lost their lives, and six were rescued by the Royal Navy and put ashore in Londonderry, Northern Ireland

 

Alfredo FRENDO, Able Seaman, was on board s.s. Noya in World War I. On 30th August 1917 when his ship was about 8 miles off The Lizard, south-west England, it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk. One man was killed. In 1924 his home address was 63 Strada San Francesco, Senglea

 

G. GALDES, died in WWI. He was a Cook on the s.s. Halifax

 

Lewis GALDIES, Ordinary Seaman, was on board the s.s. Ruel and s.s. Churston in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 9 Strada Sebastiano, Curmi

 

Anthony GALEA, died 30th August 1940. A crewman on the merchant ship Chelsea. His ship was in a convoy from Canada and carried 7,600 tons of maize. They were 58 miles off Cape Wrath when in the very early hours of the morning a German U-boat fired torpedoes at the convoy. Three merchant ships were hit. The Chelsea initially stayed afloat but later foundered. 24 men died, and 11 were rescued by the Royal Navy

 

C. GALEA, died 28th May 1917. He was a Steward on the s.s. Antinoe, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 150 miles off Bishop Rock. The Master and twenty men died

 

Consiglio GALEA, died 19th March 1943, aged 35 years. He was a F & T on the cargo ship Glendalough, which was sailing up the east coast of England and struck a mine off Cromer

 

 

Edward GALEA, died 12th December 1942, aged 32 years. He was a Fireman on the 2,272 ton merchant ship Knitsley. His ship had left London and was sailing up the east coast of England bound for the Tyne when it was hit by a torpedo fired by a German Motor Torpedo Boat. Their position was off Lowestoft. Twelve men lost their lives

 

Giuseppe GALEA, aged 26 years, of Strada Mercanti, Valletta, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Gerald GALEA, died 17th January 1942. He was an Assistant Cook on the Culebra.

Whilst on a voyage to Bermuda in convoy bad weather on the 12th caused the ships to scatter. His ship was sunk by gunfire from a German U-boat, and all the men on board lost their lives

 

L. GALEA, died 23rd December 1941. A Fireman on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Lucrezio GALEA, died 24th February 1942. He was Engineer Officer on the merchant ship White Crest. Whilst in the North Atlantic about half way between Canada and England his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. Seven men died and seven men survived

 

Paolo GALEA, Assistant Steward, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 18 years, the son of Mary and Vincent Galea, of Birkirkara

 

Vincent GALEA, Able Seaman. In World War I he was on the s.s. Dover Castle. This was a liner that had been converted into a hospital ship. About 7 p.m. on 26th May 1917 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. The destroyer HMS Cameleon took off the wounded and crew. The Master and a volunteer crew stayed on board in an effort to save the ship, but a torpedo about one hour later sank her. She was about 50 miles north of Bona. In 1924 his home address was 68 Strada Sirene, Senglea

 

Joseph GASCIULLI, died 7th December 1942. A Fireman on the passenger ship Ceramic. Launched at the Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast in 1913 this ship was in regular use between England and Australia before WWII. He was on board when it left Liverpool on 26th November bound for Australia via South Africa. There was a total of 657 persons on board. During the night of the 6th/7th December they were off the Azores in the Central Atlantic when the ship was hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat. A couple of minutes later two more torpedoes struck the ship. Even though it was dark several lifeboats were launched. The ship remained afloat until three hours later when it was again torpedoed and sank. The weather was very bad, causing a very rough sea. The U-boat surfaced around noon. There were many dead bodies and emply lifebelts floating in the sea. Sapper Eric Munday of the Royal Engineers was pulled from the sea by crewmen of the submarine. The strong winds and high waves forced the German Captain to submerge again. Sapper Munday was the only survivor and was landed in Europe to be placed in a Prisoner-of-War camp. Of the 656 persons who died that night there were 264 members of the crew, 244 military personnel mainly nurses from the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service, and 133 fare-paying passengers

 

C. GATT, died 1st September 1916. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Swift Wings when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 18 miles off the coast of Algeria. Two men were killed and the Master taken prisoner

 

Emmanuele GATT, Able Seaman, was on the s.s.Margit in World War I. On 4th April 1917 whilst the ship was about 80 miles off Cape Matapan, south coast of Greece, it was hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat and sank. In 1924 his home address was 12 Strada Carmine, Tarxien

 

J. GATT, died in WWI. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Cardiff

 

Nicholas GATT, died 14th February 1940. He was a F & T on board the merchant ship Langleeford, which was on its way from Canada to England with a cargo of 6,800 tons of wheat. Early that morning his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank with the loss of four crew members. The spot was about 70 miles off Fastnet, and the Master with 29 crewmen were rescued and put ashore in Ireland

 

Salvatore GATT, Able Seaman in World War I. His home address was 57 Strada Antica, Vittoriosa, in 1924

 

Carmelo GAUCI, died 15th September 1941. He was a Cook on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

G. GAUCI, died 28th May 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Antinoe, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 150 miles off Bishop Rock. The Master and twenty men died

 

G. GERADA, was a Cook on the s.s. Lena. It is assumed that his ship was sunk by enemy action about 14th August 1917 whilst on a voyage from Huelva to Bristol. All 23 men on board lost their lives

 

William GERADA, 2nd Steward, was on board s.s. Ivydene in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat 17th May 1918, about 36 miles off Cape Bougardoni

 

Frank GLOVER, died 8th June 1942. He was a Steward on the merchant ship King Lud. They were carrying military stores on a voyage from New York to Bombay via South Africa. They left Table Bay on the 31st May with a crew of 34 men and five servicemen on board. The ship was lost without trace

 

Thomas GRAVINA, died 11th May 1940. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Tringa. His ship hit a mine and sank in the English Channel

 

Anthony GRECH, died 3rd February 1942, aged 48 years. A F & T on the Loch Ranza. His ship was carrying radio equipment and anti-aircraft guns for the defence of Palembang, Sumatra. On 3rd February his ship was attacked by Japanese bomber aircraft in the South China Sea, off Malaysia. The ship was beached close by on Abang Island but was considered a total loss

 

 

Emmanuel GRECH, died 17th September 1940. He was a Carpenter on the merchant ship Tregenna. His ship left Halifax with convoy HX-71 bound for Newport, South Wales, with a cargo of about 8,000 tons of steel. In the North Atlantic about 80 miles north west of Rockall they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. Thirty-three men died and there were four survivors

 

George C. GRECH, died 14th March 1941, aged 44 years. He was a Cook on the merchant ship Western Chief. His ship had left New York bound for Newport with a cargo of steel. South of Iceland they were torpedoed by the Italian submarine Emo

 

Giovanni Maria GRECH, Fireman, was on board the s.s. Caledonia in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 125 miles from Malta. The ship sank, and the Master was taken as a prisoner. One crewman lost his life. In 1924 his home address was Vicolo Marsa, Hamrun

 

Joseph GRECH, died 18th October 1940. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Fiscus. His ship was in Convoy SC7 which consisted of around thirty ships, and left Nova Scotia on 5th October. They were carrying a cargo of steel and crated aircraft on deck. In the evening of the 18th east of Rockall five German U-boats attacked the convoy and caused havoc. The Fiscus was hit by a torpedo and exploded then sank. There were no survivors. From this Convoy twenty-one ships were sunk by German U-boats

 

Michael GRECH, aged 24 years,died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Saverio GRECH, died 2nd October 1941. He was a Cook on the Empire Wave, a newly completed armed merchant ship, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic, about 500 miles south of Cape Farewell, Greenland, on 2nd October 1941. 29 men died including the Master of the ship. 31 men were rescued and taken to Iceland

 

A. GRIMA, died 27th June 1918. He was a Trimmer on the Hospital Ship s.s. Llandovery Castle, when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 116 miles west of Fastnet in the Atlantic. 146 persons on board lost their lives

 

Coronato GRIMA, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

John GRIMA, died 11th April 1943. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Lancastrian Prince. His ship was in a convoy sailing in ballast from England to North America when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic close to Newfoundland. All the 45 men on board lost their lives

 

M. GRIMA, died on 24th October 1916. He was a fireman on the s.s. Clearfield, a Merchant Navy tanker. They sailed from Invergordon, Scotland, on 21st October 1916 bound for Hampton Roads in ballast, and passed Cape Wrath on 23rd. The next day his ship went missing, and is believed to have been sunk by a torpedo from the German U-boat U55 off the Flannan Islands North West of the Outer Hebrides. All the 36 men on board were lost including the Master George Guntlett Gaine

 

 

J. GULIA, died in World War I. He was a Doctor, the Medical Officer on the s.s. Bermudian

 

Felix GUSMAN, died 17th October 1941. An Ordinary Seaman on the Pass of Balmaha, on a voyage from Alexandria, Egypt, to Tobruk loaded with petrol. Torpedoed by a German U-boat about fifty miles west ofAlexandria. Due to the cargo the ship was engulfed in flames and there were no survivors amongst the 18 men on board

 

Benigno HABER, died 6th June 1940, aged 48 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Harcalo. They had loaded a cargo of ore at a North African port and joined a convoy at Gibraltar for the voyage to England. They were heading for Middlesbrough, and were passing through the Straits of Dover when they struck a mine off Ramsgate

 

 

C. HAMMET, died 17th May 1918. He was a Cook on the s.s. Mavisbrook which was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Cabo de Gata, on the Spanish Mediterranean coast. The Master and seventeen crewmen lost their lives

 

R. HAMMET, died 8th June 1918. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Hunsgrove when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 6 miles off Trevose Head. Three men lost their lives

 

George HAMMETT, 532F, Fireman, Royal Navy Reserve, died 15th October 1917, aged 36 years. He was on board M.F.A. Whitehead when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 40 miles off Suda Bay, Crete. The son of Concetta and Richard Hammett of Cospicua and husband of Mrs. R. Hammett of Zabbar

 

Reginald HERAGHTY, died 11th September 1941. A F & T on the merchant ship Empire Crossbill. In a convoy when attacked by German U-boat, and torpedoed. The ship sank immediately and all 49 men on board lost their lives. Location in the North Atlantic, south east of Greenland

 

Joseph INGUANEZ, died 17th March 1943. He was a Fireman on the Dutch merchant ship Alderamin. In convoy SC.122 his ship was attacked by German U-boats and torpedoed in the North Atlantic, south east of Cape Farewell, Greenland. The ship sank very quickly. Two lifeboats were damaged and a third capsized on being launched. The only remaining boat which had a motor on it was safely lowered with the Chief Engineer and three men in it, but ignored other men in the water and on liferafts, and failed to pick up other survivors. The following October the officer was brought before a Board of Enquiry in London, and admitted he failed to return and pick up other survivors but stated he was overcome by fright and doubted his ability to manoeuvre the boat in the heavy swell, and the matter was dropped. Fortunately the Saxifrage and Zamalek picked up other men, and only fifteen men from the 64 men on board lost their lives  

 

Albert JONES, died 29th September 1942, aged 59 years. He was a Carpenter on the merchant ship Baron Ogilvy. His ship left Rio de Janiero on the 18th and was sailing via Freetown in West Africa to England with a cargo of iron ore. when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. Eight men on board died, and 33 survivors were picked up by a Portugese merchant ship and taken to Capetown, South Africa

 

Joseph KOROSKY, Donkeyman, died 10th June 1917, aged 46 years. He was on the 1,400 ton Steamer s.s. Galicia which was torpedoed and sunk by German U-boat U.70, in the Atlantic, about 140 miles from Fastnet, 48.55N, 10.00W.

He was born in Malta the son of Carmelo and Rosa Korosky.

He married Ethel Georgina Sanders, of London, and the couple had three daughters. At the time of his death, his widow was living in London, and she died in 1927

 

Photo supplied by David Edmonds from his collection.

Leonard LANE, died 7th March 1943. An Engineer Officer on the Motor Tanker Empire Light. Whist sailing from Manchester to New York his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat on the 7th and was abandoned badly damaged. Of the 50 men on board, 45 were killed and the five survivors taken by HMS Beverley to St.Johns. Newfoundland. On the 12th March the abandoned ship was sunk by a German U-boat

 

H. LEONARDI, died 18th August 1917. He was a Steward on the s.s. Rosario, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and nineteen crewmen died, one survivor was picked up by the U-boat

 

Albert S. LONGO, died 13th January 1942, aged 49 years. He was Engineer Officer on the Lerwick, which was attacked by German aircraft whilst sailing up the east coast of England to the Tyne. His ship sank off Robin Hood’s Bay, Yorkshire

 

Angelo MAGRI, Fireman, on board the s.s. Imperial Transport in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk about 140 miles from Alexandria, 11th April 1917. The Master was taken as a prisoner. In 1924 his home address was 38 Piazza Mercato, Tarxien

 

Antonio MAGRI, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 32 years, the son of Antonia and Paolo Magri, and husband of Marianna Magri of 45 Annunziata Street, Tarxien

 

Carmelo MAGRI, Assistant Steward, Mercantile Marine Reserve, died 15th October 1917. He was on board M.F.A. Whitehead when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 40 miles off Suda Bay, Crete

 

Charles MAGRI, died 12th May 1941, aged 52 years. He was the Chief Steward on the Fowbery Tower. Soon after leaving Hull on a voyage to the U.S.A., his ship was attacked and sunk by German aircraft. Six crewmen were killed

 

Ernest MAGRI, died 20th May 1941. He was the Chief Steward on the merchant ship Norman Monarch. His ship sailed from Halifax with a cargo of 8,300 tons of wheat and was in convoy HX-126, when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south east of Cape Farewell, Greenland. Another ship the Harpagus dropped back and rescued all 48 men from the Norman Monarch. However, as it tried to rejoin the convoy the Harpagus was torpedoed and 26 men from the Norman Monarch lost their lives, the other 22 were picked up by the Royal Navy and taken to Iceland

 

Michele MAGRIN, Fireman, Merchant Navy, in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 39 Strada Santa Maria, Hamrun

 

Rupert MALLINOR-VICKERS, died 19th July 1940, aged 18 years. He was the Radio Officer on the merchant ship Pearlmoor. His ship left Freetown, West Africa, bound for Immingham, but when off the north east coast of Ireland about 60 miles from Malin Head, they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. Thirteen men lost their lives but 26 survived and were put ashore in Ireland

 

 

C. MALLIA, died 22nd March 1917. He was a Fireman on the m.v. Stuart Prince when his ship was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland by a German U-boat. The Master and nineteen crewmen lost their lives

 

Carmel MALLIA, died 16th April 1941. He was a Seaman on the Dutch ship Friesland, which had sailed from Dagenham in the River Thames up the east coast of England. His ship was heavily attacked by German dive bombers off Cromer and sank with the loss of 13 crewmen

 

Emmanuel MALLIA, died 21st December 1942. He was an Able Seaman on the Greek merchant ship Oropos. They had left London on the 2nd bound for Halifax, but became a straggler from convoy ONS-152. In the middle of the night they were torpedoed by a German U-boat, when in the North Atlantic south east of Greenland. All the 34 men on board lost their lives, there were no survivors

 

G. MALLIA, aged 35 years, the son of Giovanni and Maddalena Mallia, 12 Nursing Sisters Street, St.Julians, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

John MALLIA, died 27th September 1940. He was a Fireman on the Coast Wings. His ship was a small 862 ton merchant ship and became a straggler from Convoy OG-43. It was torpedoed by a German U-boat when in the Atlantic south west of Ireland. All the sixteen men on board lost their lives

 

L. MALLIA, died 20th December 1917. He was a Boatswain on the s.s. Waverley when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. 22 men were killed, but there were some survivors

 

Francesco MANGION, Fireman, in World War I he was on the s.s. Incemoor. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about fifty miles off Pantelleria on 20th August 1917. In 1924 his home address was 37 Via Croce, Marsa

 

Joseph MANGION, died 9th April 1941. He was a Motorman on the Norwegian motor vessel Buesten. The son of Andrew and Mary Ann Mangion, and husband of Emilia Mangion. Aged 59 years, he is buried in Dartmouth cemetery, Devon

 

S. MANGION, died 16th March 1917. He was a Fireman on the tanker Narragansett, owned by the Anglo-American Oil Company. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic south-west of Ireland, the Master and forty-five crewmen lost their lives

 

Charles MARLOW, died 14th November 1944. He was a Fireman on the small 400 ton steamship Harley. His ship was overwhelmed by the weather off Fife Ness and sank. The Master and six crewmen lost their lives

 

Joseph MEDINA, Fireman. In World War I he was on the s.s. Mavisbrook. On 17th May 1918 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank about 50 miles off the coast of Spain. The Master and 17 men were killed. In 1924 his home address was 49 Strada Cospicua, Cospicua

 

Paolo MEJLAK, Able Seaman, was on board the s.s. Okement in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 140 miles from Malta on 17th February 1917. The Master and ten men were killed. In 1924 his home address was 11 Strada Passaggio, Nadur, Gozo

 

Domenic MERCIECA, died 23rd December 1941. A Greaser on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Emmanuel MERCIECA, died 8th January 1945, He was a Greaser on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Carmelo MICALLEF, Assistant Cook, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 46 years, the son of Maria and Giachino Micallef, and husband of Giovanna Ellul Micallef of 149 Strada Reale, Zabbar

 

Charles MICALLEF, from Sliema, died 17th March 1943. Second Officer on the merchant ship Granville. His ship was part of Convoy SC-122 which sailed from New York on 5th March. It was carrying military stores and mail for the American Forces on Iceland. They were torpedoed by a German U-boat, and several men died in the attack. The others abandoned ship before she broke her back and disappeared beneath the sea. The corvette Lavender picked up 35 men from the sea rather quickly since conditions were good and was about to leave the scene when another man was spotted in the water. It could be seen that he was alive but unable to swim. Lieutenant William Weller RNVR., of the Lavender dived into the sea and brought the injured man to the Lavender where he was put in the sick bay but was unconscious and only just alive. It was Charles Micallef. Despite all the medical attention he died. His body was sewn up in canvas, and weighted. All the Granville’s survivors and many of the Lavender’s crew gathered on deck where the body had been placed on a burial board covered with the Union Jack. Captain L.G. Pilcher read a short prayer, then the end of the board was raised and Micallef’s body slid into the sea

 

E. MICALLEF, died 28th May 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Antinoe, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 150 miles off Bishop Rock. The Master and twenty men died

 

G. MICALLEF, died 27th May 1917. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Dartmoor which was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 35 miles from Fastnet in the Atlantic. The Master and 24 men lost their lives

 

Giovanni MICALLEF, Assistant Cook, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 24 years, the son of Henry and Mary Borg Micallef of 4 School Street, Hamrun

 

Hector MICALLEF, died 6th September 1941, aged 57 years, on board the Maine

 

John MICALLEF, died 3rd November 1941. An Ordinary Seaman on the merchant ship Rose Schiaffino, whose home port was Cardiff. They sailed on 31st October from St.Johns with a cargo of about 4,200 tons of iron ore. Torpedoed by a German U-boat about 225 miles off St.Johns, when all 41 persons on board lost their lives

 

 

Antoine MIFSUD, died 10th May 1941. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Empire Caribou. His ship was carrying a cargo af about 2,000 tons of chalk, when torpedoed by a German U-boat south of Iceland. Thirty-four men died and eleven survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Benedetto MIFSUD, died 19th April 1942. He was a Cook on the merchant ship Harpagon. His ship left New York on the 17th bound for Bombay via Capetown and was carrying about 8,000 tons of cargo including military equipment. They were in the Atlantic about level with the State of Carolina when hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat. 41 men on board were killed and eight survivors were picked up by an Argentinian merchant ship and put ashore in Buenos Aires

 

Giuseppe MIFSUD, was on board the s.s. Egyptian Prince in World War I. His ship was captured by a submarine on 12th May 1917, and then sunk by bombs. His home address was in Nadur, Gozo, in 1924

 

Michael MIFSUD, died 26th February 1941. A F & T on the 5,000 ton Llanwern. Bombed and sunk by German aircraft whilst in convoy about 300 miles off Blacksod Bay, Co. Mayo, Ireland. Twenty-seven of those on board lost their lives

 

P. MINUTI, died 28th May 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Antinoe, when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 150 miles off Bishop Rock. The Master and twenty men died

 

Alfred MIZZI, died 17th March 1943. He was a Trimmer on the Dutch merchant ship Alderamin. In convoy SC.122 his ship was attacked by German U-boats and torpedoed in the North Atlantic south east of Capre Farewell, Greenland. The ship sank very quickly. Two lifeboats were damaged and a third capsized on being launched. The only remaining boat which had a motor on it was safely lowered with the Chief Engineer and three men in it, but ignored other men in the water and on liferafts, and failed to pick up other survivors. The following October the officer was brought before a Board of Enquiry in London, and admitted he failed to return and pick up other survivors but stated he was overcome by fright and doubted his ability to manoeuvre the boat in the heavy swell, and the matter was dropped. Fortunately the Saxifrage and Zamalek picked up other men, and only fifteen men from the 64 men on board lost their lives

 

Anthony MIZZI, died 22nd November 1942. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Start Point. His ship left Milford Haven on 22nd October with a cargo of about 6,300 tons of coal for Freetown, West Africa. Around mid-day on the 10th November whilst in the Central Atlantic south west of the Cape Verde islands they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. The Chief Officer and Chief Engineer were taken aboard the U-boat and later landed in France, from where they were sent to the Milag Nord camp. The Master and 46 other survivors were picked up after 12 days by a merchant ship and put ashore in Brazil

 

C. MIZZI, died 9th January 1919. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Northumbria, and had left Baltimore, USA, bound for Sunderland. Although WWI had been over for two months his ship struck a mine off Middlesbrough, North Sea. It is believed that lifeboats were launched but lost in the rough sea. There were only two survivors

 

Gerald MIZZI, died 7th December 1942. A Fireman on the passenger ship Ceramic. Launched at the Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast in 1913 this ship was in regular use between England and Australia before WWII. He was on board when it left Liverpool on 26th November bound for Australia via South Africa. There was a total of 657 persons on board. During the night of the 6th/7th December they were off the Azores in the Central Atlantic when the ship was hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat. A couple of minutes later two more torpedoes struck the ship. Even though it was dark several lifeboats were launched. The ship remained afloat until three hours later when it was again torpedoed and sank. The weather was very bad, causing a very rough sea. The U-boat surfaced around noon. There were many dead bodies and emply lifebelts floating in the sea. Sapper Eric Munday of the Royal Engineers was pulled from the sea by crewmen of the submarine. The strong winds and high waves forced the German Captain to submerge again. Sapper Munday was the only survivor and was landed in Europe to be placed in a Prisoner-of-War camp. Of the 656 persons who died that night there were 264 members of the crew, 244 military personnel mainly nurses from the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service, and 133 fare-paying passengers

 

Antonio MONSIGNEUR, Steward, s.s. British Sun in World War I. On 1st May 1917 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank about 230 miles from Malta. In 1924 his home address was 91 Strada Mercanti, Valletta

 

Giovanni MONTEBELLO, aged 32 years, of Casal Curmi, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Emmanuel MOORE, died 12th February 1941. A Fireman on the Derrynane. His ship was in a convoy which left Sierra Leone on the 30th January bound for England, but was without any naval escort. They were about 200 miles south east of the Azores when they were attacked by German cruiser Admiral Hipper, whose 8-inch guns quickly sank her  

 

Anthony MUSCAT, died 5th January 1941, aged 42 years. He was a F & T on the Shakespear. His ship had left Liverpool bound for North America, but when off the coast of Senegal, West Africa, they encountered the Italian submarine Cappellini. After exchanging gun fire at long range for about two hours the Shakespear’s gun was hit and put out of action. Fires were started in the bridgehouse and holds, so the crew took to the lifeboats. The submarine captain honourably had the lifeboats towed until land was in sight then cast them off. Twenty men had died but twenty-two survived

 

Carmelo MUSCAT, died 22nd August 1940. He was a Fireman on the Canadian merchant ship Thorold. His ship was bombed by German aircraft whilst in the Irish Sea

 

 

Emmanuel MUSCAT, died 17th October 1941. An Able Seaman on the Pass of Balmaha, on a voyage from Alexandria, Egypt, to Tobruk loaded with petrol. Torpedoed by a German u-boat about fifty miles west ofAlexandria. Due to the cargo the ship was engulfed in flames and there were no survivors amongst the 18 men on board

 

Francis MUSCAT, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

John MUSCAT, Assistant Engineer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 29 years, the son of Teresa and Vincenzo Muscat, and husband of Marianna Muscat of 6 St.Paul's Square, Hamrun

 

M. MUSCAT, died 24th December 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Daybreak when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Northern Ireland. The Master and twenty crewmen lost their lives

 

Saverio MUSCAT, died 3rd February 1942, aged 30 years. A Greaser on the Loch Ranza. His ship was carrying radio equipment and anti-aircraft guns for the defence of Palembang, Sumatra. On 3rd February his ship was attacked by Japanese bomber aircraft in the South China Sea, off Malaysia. The ship was beached close by on Abang Island but was considered a total loss

 

Joe MUSIN, died 14th January 1942. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Empire Surf. His ship had left Florida and was in a convoy to England when just after midnight they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. At the time they were south of Iceland in the North Atlantic. Forty-seven men lost their lives, and six were rescued by the Royal Navy and put ashore in Londonderry, Northern Ireland

 

William MUSU, died 13th October 1942. A F & T on the merchant ship Ashworth, His ship had left Halifax, Canada, with a full cargo of 7,300 tons of bauxite destined for Belfast, Northern Ireland. When south of Greenland, in the North Atlantic, it was torpedoed in the early hours of the morning of the 13th by a German U-boat and sank. All 49 men on board died, there were no survivors

 

George PACE, died 5th December 1939. He was the Refrigeration Engineer on the merchant ship Navasota. They left Liverpool and were bound for Buenos Aires, but were torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic about 150 miles west of Bishops Rock, off the south coast of Ireland. Thirty-seven men lost their lives and there were 45 survivors

 

George PACE, died 28th September 1940. The Engineer Officer on the cargo ship Dalveen. His ship had left Montreal bound for Hull. They were attacked by German bombers and sunk near Rattray Head. Thirty-two of the crew lost their lives

 

Joseph PACE, died 22nd August 1940. He was a Fireman on the Canadian merchant ship Thorold. His ship was bombed by German aircraft whilst in the Irish Sea

 

Paolo PACE, Steward, was on board the Dalkeith in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 9f Strada Magazzini, Floriana

 

Paolo PACE, Fireman, was on board s.s. Brika and s.s. Adams in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 48 Strada Manderaggio, Valletta

 

Sidney PACE, died 15th July 1942. He was a Greaser on the merchant ship Empire Attendant. His ship left Liverpool bound for India via South Africa. Around midnight on the 14th/15th July when they were south of the Canary Islands, they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. All 59 men on board lost their lives

 

William PACE, died 19th August 1942. The Master of the merchant ship Cressington Court. His ship sailed from Trinidad on the 14th bound for Egypt via South Africa. In the morning of the 19th they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. Eight men died and there were thirty-six survivors

 

 

E. PALMIER, died 23rd December 1941. A Chief Steward, on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Annungiato PARNIS, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. The son of Valentino and Margarita Parnis

 

Carmelo PAVIA, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

John PHILLIPS, died 8th June 1942. He was a Cadet on the merchant ship King Lud. They were carrying military stores on a voyage from New York to Bombay via South Africa. They left Table Bay on the 31st May with a crew of 34 men and five servicemen on board. The ship was lost without trace

 

L.G. PHILLIPS, died 8th October 1917. He was a Cook on the s.s. Greldon which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Atlantic. The Master and 27 members of the crew lost their lives

 

J. PIRATA, died in World War I. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward  which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August 1915 she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Carmel PISANI, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Charles PISANI, died 12th December 1942. He was a Donkeyman on the 2,272 ton merchant ship Knitsley. His ship had left London and was sailing up the east coast of England bound for the Tyne when it was hit by a torpedo fired by a German Motor Torpedo boat. Their position was off Lowestoft. Twelve men lost their lives

 

Giuseppe PISANI, died 16th September 1939. He was a Boiler Attendant on the Aviemore, and lost his life when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic about 220 miles south west of Cape Clear, Ireland. After being hit by two torpedoes his ship sank immedately. This was the first time in World War II that a convoy had been attacked by U-boats. Eleven survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Salvatore PISANI, died 2nd October 1941. He was a Cook on the Empire Wave, a newly completed armed merchant ship, which was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic, about 500 miles south of Cape Farewell, Greenland, on 2nd October 1941. 29 men died including the Master of the ship. 31 men were rescued and taken to Iceland

 

Francis PITHERS, died 27th November 1940, aged 17 years. He was a Steward’s Boy on board the 16,712-ton Rangitane. The ship travelled between New Zealand and England and this was the seventh voyage since the outbreak of war. Whilst in the Pacific she was attacked by two German surface raiders, the Komet and the Orion. During the night they opened fire, their shells disabled the steering gear, made several holes in the hull below the waterline and damaged the superstructure. Apart from the crew there were 111 passengers on board. They abandoned ship and took to the lifeboats. After sinking the Rangitane, the two German ships plus the Kulmerland, picked up the 295 survivors

 

Calcedonio PORTELLI, died 8th January 1945, He was a Donkeyman on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

 

Carmelo PORTELLI, Trimmer, died 20th January 1918. He was travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea

 

Francis PORTELLI, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

G.B. PORTELLI, Steward, was on the s.s. Dungeness in World War I. On 30th May 1918 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Sea. Four men died, but the ship managed to reach port. In 1924 his home address was 17 Strada San Michele, Cospicua

 

J. PORTELLI, died 27th October 1942, aged 25 years. A member of the crew of the Sourabaya. His ship left New York on the 18th October for Liverpool, carrying about 7.800 tons of fuel oil and other military stores. South west of Cape Farewell, Greenland they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. Eighty-one men were rescued by the Canadian Navy and put ashore at Liverpool. The other seventy-seven were taken on board the Bic Island which was torpedoed two days later and they all lost their lives

 

John PORTELLI, died 27th July 1941, aged 29 years. The Boatswain on the merchant ship Hawkinge. His ship was carrying a cargo of coal from Glasgow to Lisbon. In the middle of the night they were torpedoed by a German U-boat about 500 miles north west of Corunna, Northern Spain. Fifteen men on board lost their lives, whilst sixteen survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

Joseph PORTELLI, died 25th March 1943. He was a Fireman on the Swedish ship Atland, which collided with the s.s. Carso, and sank off Peterhead, on the north east coast of Scotland

 

Gillian POUSTIE, died 15th September 1941. He was a Donkeyman on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Luca PSAILA, aged 20 years, of Casal Curmi, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Salvatore PULIS, died 16th February 1940. He was a F & T on board the merchant ship Langleeford, which was on its way from Canada to England with a cargo of 6,800 tons of wheat. Early that morning his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank with the loss of four crew members. The spot was about 70 miles off Fastnet, and the Master with 29 crewmen were rescued and put ashore in Ireland

 

 

Paul Saviour Michael RAPA, Donkeyman, on board the Paraguay, died 25th April 1947

 

Lewis John RICKETTS, died 13th December 1939. A Cadet on the merchant ship Deptford. His ship was sailing from Narvik to Middlesborough with a cargo of iron ore, and was close to the Norwegian coast. During the afternoon of the 13th it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank within five minutes. A total of 32 men died, including the Master and two Norwegian Pilots. Five men survived and were rescued by a Norwegian ship and landed in Norway

 

Romeo SAFFARESE, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Emmanuel SAID, died 12th December 1942, aged 29 years. He was a F & T on the 2,272 ton merchant ship Knitsley. His ship had left London and was sailing up the east coast of England bound for the Tyne when it was hit by a torpedo fired by a German Motor Torpedo boat. Their position was off Lowestoft. Twelve men lost their lives

 

G. SAID, died 20th December 1917. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Waverley when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. 22 men were killed, but there were some survivors

 

John SAID, died 23rd December 1941. A Greaser on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Francis SALIBA, died 7th November 1942, aged 27 years. A Seaman on the merchant ship Roxby. His ship was part of convoy ON-142 and had left Cardiff with a cargo of coal for Halifax. In the afternoon of the 7th his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic when they were about mid-way between England and Canada. The ship sank within half an hour, and 34 men lost their lives. There were thirteen survivors who were picked up and landed in St.Johns

 

 

Emmanuele SAMMUT, died 6th September 1941, aged 35 years, on board the Maine

 

Joseph SAMMUT, died 3rd February 1942, aged 39 years. A F & T on the Loch Ranza. His ship was carrying radio equipment and anti-aircraft guns for the defence of Palembang, Sumatra. On 3rd February his ship was attacked by Japanese bomber aircraft in the South China Sea, off Malaysia. The ship was beached close by on Abang Island but was considered a total loss

 

Giovanni SAVASTA,, died 7th December 1939. He was an Able Seaman on the Thomas Walton, an old merchant ship launched in 1917. Whilst on a voyage from Port Talbot to Narvik in Norway it was torpedoed in Norwegian territorial waters by a German U-boat in the afternoon of the 7th. The ship broke in two and sank, and 13 men died. Another 31 survived and were rescued by a German merchant ship which landed them in Norway

 

Nicholas SCHEMBRI, died 3rd February 1942, aged 46 years. A F & T on the Loch Ranza. His ship was carrying radio equipment and anti-aircraft guns for the defence of Palembang, Sumatra. On 3rd February his ship was attacked by Japanese bomber aircraft in the South China Sea, off Malaysia. The ship was beached close by on Abang Island but was considered a total loss

 

George SCICLUNA, died 6th September 1941, aged 41 years, on board the Maine

 

Joseph SCICLUNA, died 10th June 1941, aged 31 years. A F & T on the merchant ship Ainderby, In February his ship was damaged by gunfire from the German Cruiser Admiral Hipper, and put into Funchal, Madeira. The repairs took three months, and after sailing from Funchal, during the morning of 10th June his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, and sank about 130 miles off the west coast of Ireland. The ship was carrying a cargo of 7,700 tons iron ore. Twelve men died that day and 29 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy

 

 

Domenic SCIFO, died 2nd December 1940. A Donkeyman on the Lady Glanely. His ship started this voyage in Vancouver and carried a cargo of wheat and timber, the destination was London. They passed through the Panama Canal, but whilst in the North Atlantic the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. All 32 men on board lost their lives

 

Angelo SCORENA, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Nazzareno SINAGRA, died 2nd January 1942. He was a Fireman on the merchant ship Waziristan, part of convoy PQ-7a to Russia. His ship left Iceland on 26th December but became separated from its escort by bad weather, and was stranded on the edge of the Polar ice cap. Attacked by German aircraft in the Barents Sea off the north coast of Norway, then sunk by a German U-boat

 

Harry SKY, died 24th August 1942. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Katvaldis, In the middle of the night whilst in the North Atlantic south of Greenland his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat. Three men were killed but 40 were rescued

 

Alfred SMITH, died 22nd September 1942, aged 24 years. He was the Radio Officer on the motor tanker Athelsultan. His ship left Florida and was sailing via Halifax to Liverpool. It was part of convoy SC-100, and the Convoy Commadore was on board. South east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. Fifty-one men of those on board lost their lives, whilst 10 survived. They were picked up by the Royal Navy and Royal Canadian Navy

 

John SMITH, died 23rd December 1941. A Fireman on the Shuntien. In the evening of 23rd December his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Libya. Apart from the Master, 47 crew members and 18 gunners, the ship also carried between 850 and 1100 enemy Prisoners of War. A good number of the men were rescued by the Royal Navy ship HMS Salvia, but they all lost their lives the following day when HMS Salvia was sunk by torpedoes from a German U-boat. Other survivors from the Shuntien, were rescued by HMS Heythorp. Precise figures are not known

 

Angelo SPITERI, Carpenter, on board s.s. Glenbridge in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Mediterranean, and beached, 27th November 1917. In 1924 his home address was 92c Strada Zecca, Valletta

 

C. SPITERI, died 8th June 1918. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Hunsgrove when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 6 miles off Trevose Head. Three men lost their lives

 

Carmelo SPITERI, died 20th January 1918. He was a Trimmer travelling on the Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Louvain, which was torpedoed by the German U-boat U22 in the Aegean Sea. Aged 26 years, he was the son of Giuseppa and Angelo Spiteri, and husband of Francesca Spiteri of 28 Strada San Giovanni, Cospicua

 

Emmanuele SPITERI, Fireman, on board s.s. Euston in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk about 37 miles off Cape Matapan, south coast of Greece, 24th October 1917. In 1924 his home address was 19 Strada San Domenica, Zabbar

 

Julian SPITERI, died 16th November 1940, aged 55 years. He was a Donkeyman on the merchant ship Fabian. They sailed from Liverpool on the 24th October bound for Capetown then onto Port Said and Istanbul, and were carrying a general cargo. They left the convoy and were torpedoed by a German U-boat in central Atlantic off Liberia, West Africa. Six men died, but the Master and thirty-two other crew members survived. They were picked up and landed at Freetown

 

Michael SPITERI, died 25th March 1943. He was a Steward on the Swedish ship Atland, which collided with the s.s. Carso, and sank off Peterhead, on the north east coast of Scotland

 

 

Carmelo STAFRACE, Cook, in World War I was on board the s.s. Paros. When his ship was about 30 miles from Bardsey Island it was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank. In 1924 his home address was 13 Strada San Francesco, Senglea

 

Paul STELLINI, died 15th September 1941. He was a F & T on the Newbury, a merchant ship of around 5,200 tons. It was carrying a full cargo of coal when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat south-east of Cape Farewell, Greenland, in the North Atlantic, and sank with the loss of the total crew of 45 men

 

Anthony STIVALA, died 3rd April 1941. He was an Seaman on the tanker British Viscount, which was carrying 9,500 tons of fuel oil for the Admiralty, and destined for Scarpa Flow. In the early morning of the 3rd they were torpedoed by a German U-boat south of Iceland. The Master and 27 men died, whilst 20 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy and put ashore at Liverpool

 

Samuel STIVALA, died 22nd September 1942. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Tennessee. His ship left Canada on 13th September with a cargo of about 3,500 tons of wheat. A straggler from convoy SC-100, she was torpedoed in the middle of the night by a German U-boat, whilst south of Cape Farewell, Greenland. 15 men were killed, 12 survivors were picked up by the Royal Navy. Three days later 8 men were picked up by a United States coastguard cutter

 

Joseph SULTANA, died 11th April 1943. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Lancastrian Prince. His ship was in a convoy sailing in ballast from England to North America when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic close to Newfoundland. All the 45 men on board lost their lives

 

George TABONE, died 13th October 1942. An Assistant Steward on the merchant ship Ashworth, His ship had left Halifax, Canada, with a full cargo of 7,300 tons of bauxite destined for Belfast, Northern Ireland. When south of Greenland, in the North Atlantic, it was torpedoed in the early hours of the morning of the 13th by a German U-boat and sank. All 49 men on board died, there were no survivors

 

S. TABONE, died 30th July 1917. He was a Sailor on the s.s. Shimosa when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 220 miles off the west coast of Ireland. The Master and sixteen men lost their lives

 

Emmanuel TEUMA, died 3rd November 1941. A Carpenter on the merchant ship Rose Schiaffino, whose home port was Cardiff. They sailed on 31st October from St.Johns with a cargo of about 4,200 tons of iron ore. Torpedoed by a German U-boat about 225 miles off St.Johns, when all 41 persons on board lost their lives

 

Giuseppe TONNA, Able Seaman, was on board s.s. Ferndene in World War I. On 24th April 1917 his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sank about 150 miles from Bishop Rock, Scilly Isles, south west of England. The Master and eight crewmen were lost their lives. His home address was 105 Strada Buongiorno, Cospicua, in 1924

 

T. TONNA, died 19th August 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Gartness which was torpedoed by a German U-boat about 180 miles from Malta. The Master and twelve men died

 

D. TRAPANESE, died 19th April 1917. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Tempus when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-Boat in the Atlantic, about 130 miles off Fastnet

 

M. TURNER, died in WWI. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Yola

 

Amabile VASSALLO, died 16th March 1942, aged 37 years. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Baron Newlands. His ship was carrying a cargo of about 4,800 tons manganese ore when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat late at night six miles off the coast of Liberia, West Africa. Eighteen men lost their lives but 30 survived and were put ashore in Liberia

 

Emmanuel VASSALLO, died 31st May 1940, aged 54 years. A Greaser on the merchant ship Orangemoor.  His ship was carrying a cargo of iron ore from North Africa to the Tyne. They were off Roches Dovres in the English Channel when their ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, and sank quickly. Eighteen men lost their lives, and twenty-two survivors were picked up and put ashore in London

 

Joseph VASSALLO, died 8th January 1945, He was a Greaser on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Emmanuel VELLA, died 25th March 1943. He was a Mess Room Boy on the Swedish ship Atland, which collided with the s.s. Carso, and sank off Peterhead, on the north east coast of Scotland

 

Giuseppe VELLA, Fireman, was on board s.s. Carlton in World War I. On 29th May 1918 whilst in the Atlantic, about 270 miles from Bishop Rock, Scilly Isles, his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk. In 1924 his home address was 6 Strada San Antonio, Sliema

 

Giuseppe VELLA, died 17th January 1941. He was a Fireman on the passenger liner Almeda Star, which had sailed from Liverpool bound for Buenos Aires. His ship carried a crew of 166 and on that voyage 194 passengers. In the early morning the ship was hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat, two further torpedoes hit it, then for the next two hours the U-boat fired 28 incendiary shells, finally causing the ship to sink. They were in the Atlantic about 250 miles west of the Isle of Lewis, Orkney Islands. Everyone of the 360 persons on board lost their lives

 

 

Giuseppe VELLA, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

Joseph VELLA, died 12th April 1941. He was a Steward on the Cable & Wireless Cable Ship Retriever. They were sailing from Lemnos to Piraeus when his ship was bombed by German aircraft at midnight off the coast of Greece. The ship sank and eleven men of the fortysix crewmen lost their lives

 

L. VELLA, died 17th May 1918. He was a Seaman on the s.s. Mavisbrook which was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Cabo de Gata, on the Spanish Mediterranean coast. The Master and seventeen crewmen lost their lives

 

Paolo VELLA, Able Seaman, was on board s.s. Arcadia, s.s. Athena and s.s. Dowlais in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 112 Strada Bastione, Senglea

 

Paul VELLA, died 21st September 1940, aged 47 years. An Able Seaman on the merchant ship Blairangus. His ship had left Canada with a full cargo of timber for England, but in the early hours of the 21st when south of Iceland in the North Atlantic it was torpedoed by a German U-boat which blew off the stern of the vessel. The merchant ship Pikepool arrived at the scene about daybreak. By now the Blairangus was low in the water and deck was awash aft. Six men had died, but 28 had survived in two lifeboats and were picked up and put ashsore in Newfoundland 

 

Spiro VELLA, died 31st December 1939. He was a Greaser on the merchant ship Box Hill, His ship struck a mine off the Humber Lightship in the North Sea, and sank with the loss of 22 lives

 

E. VIDOLICH, died 1st February 1916. He was a Donkeyman on the s.s. Franz Fischer, formerly a German ship which had been taken by the British. His ship was hit by a bomb dropped by a Zeppelin airship. The ship’s Master and twelve men lost their lives

 

W. WOOD, died in WWI. He was a Cook on the s.s. Salbakken

 

Michele XERRI, Able Seaman was on board s.s. Persier in World War I. His ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat and sunk about 50 miles off Cape Spartivento, Italy, on 11th December 1917. In 1924 his home address was in Gozo

 

Paul XERRI, died 17th March 1943, aged 24 years. He was an Able Seaman on the Zouave, a merchant ship with London as its home port. They were part of Convoy SC.122 which left New York destined for England. The Convoy was composed of fifty merchant ships, one rescue ship and nine escorts. They were half way between Canada and England with a full cargo of 7,000 tons of iron ore when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. The ship sank quickly stern first and several men were trapped in the engine room, but the majority managed to get away in a lifeboat

 

Salvatore XERRI, Able Seaman, was on board s.s. Southland and s.s. Repton in World War I. In 1924 his home address was in Gozo

 

Emmanuel XICLUNA, died 17th March 1943. He was an Able Seaman on the Zouave, a merchant ship with London as its home port. They were part of Convoy SC.122 which left New York destined for England. The Convoy was composed of 50 merchant ships, 1 rescue ship and nine escorts. They were half way between Canada and England with a full cargo of 7,000 tons of iron ore when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. The ship sank quickly stern first and several men were trapped in the engine room, but the majority managed to get away in a lifeboat

 

Carmelo XIFO, Able Seaman, was on board the s.s. Bulgarian and s.s. Repton in World War I. In 1924 his home address was 6 Strada Scaloni, Valletta

 

 

Anthony ZAHRA, died 17th March 1943, aged 25 years. He was a Carpenter on the Zouave, a merchant ship with London as its home port. They were part of Convoy SC.122 which left New York destined for England. The Convoy was composed of 50 merchant ships, 1 rescue ship and nine escorts. They were half way between Canada and England with a full cargo of 7,000 tons of iron ore when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. The ship sank quickly stern first and several men were trapped in the engine room, but the majority managed to get away in a lifeboat

 

Joseph ZAHRA, Assistant Steward. He was on board the s.s. Glenart Castle in World War I. This was a hospital ship which was torpedoed by a German U-boat about ten miles off Lundy Island on 26th February 1918. There was a large loss of life. His ship was on a voyage from Newport, South Wales, to embark wounded at the French port of Brest. In 1924 his home address was 8 Strada San Enrico, Sliema

 

Paolo ZAHRA, aged 24 years, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived

 

Paul ZAHRA, died 8th January 1945, He was a F & T on the tramp steamer Ashbury. The ship was badly in need of repairs and sailed from Workington in Cumberland destined for Tyneside where the work would be carried out. They joined a convoy but whilst passing between the north coast of Scotland and the Orkney Islands the weather conditions became atrocious. Snow showers, and a Force 9 wind whipped up the sea, and the Ashbury lost touch with the convoy. The ship was driven close to the shore at the entrance of the Kyle of Tongue. Assistance was attempted by the Canadian ship Ste.Therese but unsuccessfully. The Ashbury was out of control and struck the Black Rocks at the entrance to the Kyle of Tongue and foundered. The entire crew of forty-two men died 

 

A. ZAMMIT, died 1st March 1918. He was a Donkeyman on the s.s. Penvearn when his ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Irish Sea, about 15 miles off Holyhead. Twenty-one men died, but there were survivors

 

Fidele ZAMMIT, aged 43 years, the son of Antonio and Marie Zammit, and husband of Maria Zammit, of 13 Strada San Ursola, Valletta, died 13th August 1915. He was a Fireman on the s.s. Royal Edward which in peacetime was a Canadian registered luxury passenger liner. His ship was docked in Avonmouth and on 28th July embarked troops for a voyage to Gallipoli, via Malta, Alexandria and the island of Lemnos. When she left Alexandria for Lemnos on 12th August she had on board 220 crew, 31 officers, and 1335 men. She was hit in the stern by a torpedo from a German U-boat. Within three minutes the after deck was awash and she sank within six minutes with the bow rising high in the air. At the time, probably due to wartime morale the given death toll was low, but it has now been established that fewer than 500 persons survived 

 

Francesco ZAMMIT,  died 17th January 1941. He was a Fireman on the passenger liner Almeda Star, which had sailed from Liverpool bound for Buenos Aires. His ship carried a crew of 166 and on that voyage 194 passengers. In the early morning the ship was hit by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat, two further torpedoes hit it, then for the next two hours the U-boat fired 28 incendiary shells, finally causing the ship to sink. They were in the Atlantic about 250 miles west of the Isle of Lewis, Orkney Islands. Everyone of the 360 persons on board lost their lives

 

John ZAMMIT, died 11th March 1943. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Empire Lakeland, His was a brand new ship about one year old. They became a straggler from convoy SC-121 from New York to Glasgow, and during the evening of the 11th were hit by two torpedoes fired by a German U-boat. At the time they were north west of Rockall. Everyman on board lost his life, there were no survivors

 

Maurizio ZAMMIT, died 22nd April 1941. He was a Fireman on the Norwegian merchant ship Polyana. They had sailed from Sunderland with a full cargo of coal for Freetown, West Africa. In the Central Atlantic off West Africa they were torpedoed during the night by a German U-boat. Their ship sank within one minute and all the 25 men on board lost their lives.

 

Paul ZAMMIT, died 23rd February 1941. He was a F & T on the merchant ship Anglo Peruvian, They had a full cargo of around 3,000 tons of coal when they were torpedoed by a German U-boat south of Iceland. 29 men died and 17 survivors were picked up and landed in Halifax

 

 

Raymond ZAMMIT, died 23rd April 1942. He was the Chief Steward on the merchant ship Empire Dryden. His ship left New York on the 17th for Egypt via South Africa. In the middle of the night they were torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat when off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Twenty-six men lost their lives and twenty-five men survived

 

Angelo ZARB, died 29th October 1942, aged 50 years. He was a Fireman on the armed merchant ship Primrose Hill, which was built in 1941. In the evening of the 29th when they were north west of the Cape Verde Islands they were torpedoed by a German U-boat. The torpedo hit the stern which caught fire, and three crewmen were killed. Forty-six survivors got into the lifeboats. After the crew had abandoned ship the U-boat fired two more torpedoes and the ship sank about two and a half hours after the first attack. The survivors were picked up by a merchant ship and put ashore at Freetown

 

Rosario ZARB, died 14th March 1941, aged 53 years. He was a Greaser on the merchant ship Western Chief. His ship had left New York bound for Newport with a cargo of steel. South of Iceland they were torpedoed by the Italian submarine Emo

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